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Nikos Pilos / Stern Magazine

15/12/2008 Athens, after student Alex Grigoropoulos was murdered by a policeman in Exarhia, a massive youngster's insurgerncy took place over one month all over Greece. This became the starting poind of the clashes between the police and the young people while the greek economy was facing the second year of recession, which reached its peak the following years, when the two memorantums were voted by the greek goverments and the enforcement of the austerity measures. The photo is picturing a young student, in a symbolic action, aiming a policeman with a water gun in a midle of a riot.

15/12/2008 Athens, after student Alex Grigoropoulos was murdered by a policeman in Exarhia, a massive youngster’s insurgerncy took place over one month all over Greece. This became the starting poind of the clashes between the police and the young people while the greek economy was facing the second year of recession, which reached its peak the following years, when the two memorantums were voted by the greek goverments and the enforcement of the austerity measures. The photo is picturing a young student, in a symbolic action, aiming a policeman with a water gun in a midle of a riot.

Chaos/Youth Resistance
Greece   www.nikospilos.com

This series pictures the underground political culture in Greece. Generations from the lower and middle-classes have been raised with revolt and protest. Greece is by far the country with the biggest number of demonstrations in Europe, especially amongst youths whose movement started in the ‘30s. Today, after the end of dictatorship in Greece, despite a period of political tranquillity, five protesters have died after clashes with the police. Youth movements still stand strong, expressing themselves with student-elections, by going into the streets to demonstrate or organise university sit-ins. The crisis and the austerity measures of the last five years have brought the youth back to the streets.

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